Behold I have given you every herb bearing seed upon the earth

Sometimes I just have to shoot pictures. This morning was one of those times. Near where I park my car there is the apple tree that Grandma Thunstedt gave us years ago. And under the tree is a small patch of dandelions. And they were calling me this morning. The soft overcast gave me enough of a soft box and the jacket in the car let me lay down with my little Lytro® to get dandelion height. I will share some of my favorites. At times I poke focused on a leaf when the screen was not responding to my choice of focus on the “lacy” parts.













Please, if you like it, share it. And thanks for stopping by. Ciao, Richard

QWERTY or how I started to stop fearing the keys…

Today’s quick pick is from a visit to a neighborhood store. (Not my neighborhood, or course. But, hey, somebody’s neighborhood.) I plan to go back there, so I won’t give the store name yet. I dropped by when they were closing. A million possible light fields, well almost. Here is the one I am calling “Remington Rand Revisited.”
The name in the title is not some relative from the old country, but the nonsense word spelled out by the upper six left hand letters from a standard keyboard. As you likely know, the arrangement of the keys was done this way to slow us down when we typed to allow the hammers to strike the ribbon, transferring the ink to the paper and then get out of the way of the next hammer. Believe it or not, I once visited a Beverly Hills house originally owned by the guy who invented the bell that would ring when you only had five spaces left on a line of typing so that you would not end up with a ruined paper and could hit the carriage return lever to rescue your typing job. That will not make sense to most of my readers, but just understand that those who were born in the mid twentieth century had other technologies to master before the iPad. We did drink much the same beer as you might now and did sing the rock and roll songs the first time they were popular. It was fun.
The work, albeit one.

Remember, if you liked it, share it. Thanks. Richard

Wondering about the player size? How tiny can I go?

So, I saw a question about the player… the little window that works to allow us to play with Light Field Pictures. So I thought I would try some. Here is my standard for this blog, 586 pixels wide by 600 pixels high. Then as I make it smaller I will list what I tried.

This is the standard picture: 400 X 415

And here is 250 X 262

And, how about 100 X 104

And now 50 X 52

And finally 20 X 21

Wow. Too much typing.
Thanks for coming by. Not exactly entertaining, except for geeks. :)

Olympic, the Alley, and all things marketing

So this afternoon I did my walk DT. (Downtown LA for you folks not from around these parts.) I cruised up Olympic east to the Alley- Santee Alley, the home of all things for sale to the 99 percenters left in Los Angeles after the Occupy folks moved and unknown to the majority of those who live west of the 405. I followed the bubble gun vendor and managed to get a few frames below, talked with a smiling new friend named Nancy Miller wanting me to take a stress test, and in general being invigorated by all the activity of the hive of humans called Los Angeles. Sunshine and a good walk made my day better.
Here are the related light fields packed in their cute little viewer windows. Captions appears as you move the cursor/finger near the bottom.





Thanks for stopping by. If you liked it, share it. Cheers. Richard
©2012 Richard Lund (except for the player part, of course)

The Other Edge of Night…light field, that is…

A true band of brothers gather at St. Michael’s in the City meeting at Starbucks. Last night I visited the Bible Study in Pasadena held on the patio of the coffee house to see how well the light field works at the edge of performance of the camera. I also drank some coffee, munched on coffee cake and considered the story of the prodigal son.
All the exposures seemed to be at 1/15 sec and f/2 at ISO 3200, the apparent limit of the camera from Ren Ng‘s company. When I held the camera steady, the effect could still work. If I moved or the subject did, the refocus seemed to be out of range. Also the focus in creative mode had a hard time in the dim light. Although the images are somewhat rough in appearance, I compare them to the work I did in the late 60′s and early 70′s with my Leica and Nikon on what Kodak called recording film, known as 2475 and 2484. The main problem in using that film was the curling nature of the film base. It was impossible to lay the strips out flat to make contact prints. But it did allow taking pictures in conditions that were unthinkable at the time. And I see the same noisy characteristics with many iPhoto pix in dim light. But they work for the web and our brains sort out the pixels to bring us back the memories. And today we can see color. This new camera and its processing for focus is really okay, in my book.
Look for the captions to show as you move your cursor or finger if you are on the iPad. Meet the band of brothers- Father Charles, the ever-loving son of a preacher man, Deacon Rolin, kind-eyed sage, and Bill, Wayne, new comer Larry, and me, Richard. Our one visitor of the female gender was not feeling great, so I excused her from the visuals.
St. Michael’s in the City is a new church plant in NW Pasadena. Sometimes Father Charles says that he is reaching out to the “broke, busted, and disgusted.” He certainly is reaching the 99 per centers.








Life on Wilshire Boulevard on a cloudy day in March…

So, looking at a nice part of Wilshire in what used to be called the Miracle Mile district, if I remember right, but now could be better known as Museum Row, my light field fell upon some exterior elements and a very nice person named Gene. He came to Los Angeles with a well formed dream to sell great crepes on the street and connect his culinary excellence with catering customers along the way. His crepe site is here. And here we begin the visual tale.











If you liked it, share it. Thanks for stopping by. Richard Lund lundpix@mac.com
And read my other blog HalfCoastal.com

Sometimes we see things differently…

Today I present a single image. We visited the home of an artist. She loved dolls. And I found two in different scales near each other and decided to try the light field tunnel approach.

Click on the foreground figurine. Works for me. If you like it, share it. Thanks for stopping by.