Delicate details

Made another video about the Lytro™ camera use recently. I had the blooming jasmine from my wife’s garden as my subject. We shot in the morning, so the birds did a great job of making a background track. Here are a couple of shots that I liked, followed by the video. The first is using “everyday” mode, showing off the focusing range. The other is from the “creative” mode, making the very close image possible. Have a look.



Ciao. Thanks for stopping by.
Richard

Behold I have given you every herb bearing seed upon the earth

Sometimes I just have to shoot pictures. This morning was one of those times. Near where I park my car there is the apple tree that Grandma Thunstedt gave us years ago. And under the tree is a small patch of dandelions. And they were calling me this morning. The soft overcast gave me enough of a soft box and the jacket in the car let me lay down with my little Lytro® to get dandelion height. I will share some of my favorites. At times I poke focused on a leaf when the screen was not responding to my choice of focus on the “lacy” parts.













Please, if you like it, share it. And thanks for stopping by. Ciao, Richard

Quick pix: the light field of bloomin’ cactus

We have a cactus, well a pot of cacti. Not really sure if it is one or a bunch. But just every so often, we get flowers. And they are gorgeous, as you can see for yourself. I was on my way somewhere in a hurry the other day during Holy Week and my wife called out, “It’s blooming.” So, I grabbed my Kaleidoscope shaped Lytro® and went to work. In five minutes or less, I had shot a lot. Then I was off to do my life stuff.
Parked later on my laptop, I picked a lot that I liked. And uploaded them. And now I share a few. I looked at the plant a couple days later and the blooms were just pale droops. Glad I could turn on the camera and just shoot.







Thanks for stopping by. Share it if you like it. And see my youtube comedy webisodes. Richard

So get closer…touch the lens

Not all cameras see up close well. In snapshot cameras, like the Brownie my family owned when I was a kid or event the famous Instamatic, the pictures were square, like my new Lytro®, but if you dared to get within a meter (about 39 inches for us Americans), it was game over. Blur, blur, and more blur. But my new lipstick pix machine invites me to turn on the creative mode and to move in really, really close, click on the screen to set focus, and shoot away. I had a minute in the patio of the local hospital yesterday afternoon to play with it again and found some evergreen shrubs in bright sun and in excellent health and shot a few frames. I post them for you now.
I got my degree in Biology from a department chair who was a botanist. So we did lots of field work with plants. I remember him with his Exakta and his close-up rings- I think- and wonder if his life of examination would have been much easier and more fulfilling if he had my current tool. Who knows?
(And btw, my wife did well and came home around 8. Thanks)
The work:




Thanks for stopping by. If you liked it, share it. Ciao, Richard

Melrose is the medium and “the medium is the message…”

Living in flyover country in the sixties meant that we had to depend on others to explain the complexity of the world around us. Yes, we had network television and even a PBS station when it “came in.” But there were gurus that popped up from time to time. One was Marshall McLuhan. His one sentence summary was “The medium is the message.” He described cool and hot communications and we were listening. Take a listen on youtube.
So here is my proposal: that Melrose Avenue itself is the medium. Hence, it is the message as well. Have fun.











Thanks for stopping by. If you liked it, share it. Ciao. Richard

Melrose Mandy has the look…

Went to Starbucks for a coffee on Melrose and used my coupon for a free one. And I took the lipstick pix maquina along. Took a few pictures of Mandy the hair stylist and her scooter, explaining to her and her posse about the camera. I think that they will understand it better by playing with the pix. And you might enjoy them too.






If you liked it, share it. Thanks. Richard, happy coffee drinkin’ man.

Wondering about the player size? How tiny can I go?

So, I saw a question about the player… the little window that works to allow us to play with Light Field Pictures. So I thought I would try some. Here is my standard for this blog, 586 pixels wide by 600 pixels high. Then as I make it smaller I will list what I tried.

This is the standard picture: 400 X 415

And here is 250 X 262

And, how about 100 X 104

And now 50 X 52

And finally 20 X 21

Wow. Too much typing.
Thanks for coming by. Not exactly entertaining, except for geeks. :)

Olympic, the Alley, and all things marketing

So this afternoon I did my walk DT. (Downtown LA for you folks not from around these parts.) I cruised up Olympic east to the Alley- Santee Alley, the home of all things for sale to the 99 percenters left in Los Angeles after the Occupy folks moved and unknown to the majority of those who live west of the 405. I followed the bubble gun vendor and managed to get a few frames below, talked with a smiling new friend named Nancy Miller wanting me to take a stress test, and in general being invigorated by all the activity of the hive of humans called Los Angeles. Sunshine and a good walk made my day better.
Here are the related light fields packed in their cute little viewer windows. Captions appears as you move the cursor/finger near the bottom.





Thanks for stopping by. If you liked it, share it. Cheers. Richard
©2012 Richard Lund (except for the player part, of course)

Walk on Sweetzer with Mandelbrot’s roughness in the light field…

We human types are wired for roughness. Benoit Mandelbrot and Nassim Nicolas Taleb introduced me to the term and now I see it everywhere. Took a stroll on Sweetzer on a sunny day and found some stuff with which to play with my cute little kaleidoscope camera. Or overgrown lipstick pix máquina. I loved the old tree trunks and some other elements. Just stayed in the range of exposure that worked and did not worry too much about the things I could not see. (Meaning the limited brightness range of the digital sensor – but who really cares?) It’s about light and color and roughness, not technically exacting pictures like in my other life with translites and motion pictures (Amazing Spider-Man) and television (Tonight Show). Just having a walk, taking in the world around me and loving it. As I write, Oye (Rosabel’s Cubarican Club mix) spins by Gloria Estefan. I always feel the beat way more than I can tell you how they make it. It is why beer joints at the beach are more popular than pilgrimages to desert monasteries, although we may find joy in both. Have a look.
(Remember to run your cursor near the bottom of the pix for a few words of explanation.)







Thanks for coming by. If you liked it, share it. See you again soon. Write me if you like. Richard – lundpix@mac.com

The Other Edge of Night…light field, that is…

A true band of brothers gather at St. Michael’s in the City meeting at Starbucks. Last night I visited the Bible Study in Pasadena held on the patio of the coffee house to see how well the light field works at the edge of performance of the camera. I also drank some coffee, munched on coffee cake and considered the story of the prodigal son.
All the exposures seemed to be at 1/15 sec and f/2 at ISO 3200, the apparent limit of the camera from Ren Ng‘s company. When I held the camera steady, the effect could still work. If I moved or the subject did, the refocus seemed to be out of range. Also the focus in creative mode had a hard time in the dim light. Although the images are somewhat rough in appearance, I compare them to the work I did in the late 60′s and early 70′s with my Leica and Nikon on what Kodak called recording film, known as 2475 and 2484. The main problem in using that film was the curling nature of the film base. It was impossible to lay the strips out flat to make contact prints. But it did allow taking pictures in conditions that were unthinkable at the time. And I see the same noisy characteristics with many iPhoto pix in dim light. But they work for the web and our brains sort out the pixels to bring us back the memories. And today we can see color. This new camera and its processing for focus is really okay, in my book.
Look for the captions to show as you move your cursor or finger if you are on the iPad. Meet the band of brothers- Father Charles, the ever-loving son of a preacher man, Deacon Rolin, kind-eyed sage, and Bill, Wayne, new comer Larry, and me, Richard. Our one visitor of the female gender was not feeling great, so I excused her from the visuals.
St. Michael’s in the City is a new church plant in NW Pasadena. Sometimes Father Charles says that he is reaching out to the “broke, busted, and disgusted.” He certainly is reaching the 99 per centers.